On last night’s show, Rachel Maddow highlighted key points from a previous interview (Feb.09) she did with House Speaker Nancy Pelosi.  Although Pelosi has repeatedly denied knowing about the former Bush Admin’s. use of  torture harsh interrogation tactics, a recently released memo obtained by the Washington Post says Oh! contraire.  (Video provided by News-Politics-News)

So, Pelosi was for the use of torture before she was against it? The message she is sending sure is coming across that way. Take a look at the Enhanced Interrogation Tactics memo for a detailed briefing list of the Politicos who were in on the briefings. You will see Pelosi wasn’t the only Democrat in the loop.

The Washington Post  article will give you the dirty lil details, bottom-line Pelosi lied.

Intelligence officials released documents yesterday saying that  House Speaker Nancy Pelosi(D-Calif.) was briefed in September 2002 about the use of harsh interrogation tactics against al-Qaeda suspects, seeming to contradict her repeated statements that she was never told the techniques were actually being used.

In a 10-page memo outlining an almost seven-year history of classified briefings, intelligence officials said that Pelosi and then-Rep. Porter J. Goss (R-Fla.) were the first two members of Congress briefed on the tactics. Then the ranking member and chairman of the House intelligence committee, respectively, Pelosi and Goss were briefed Sept. 4, 2002, one week before the anniversary of the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, 2001.

The memo, issued to Capitol Hill by the Office of the Director of National Intelligence and the Central Intelligence Agency, notes that the Pelosi-Goss briefing covered “EITs including the use of EITs” on Abu Zubaida. EIT is an acronym for enhanced interrogation technique, and Abu Zubaida, whose real name is Zayn al-Abidin Muhammed Hussein, was one of the earliest valuable al-Qaeda members captured. He also was the first to have the controversial tactic of simulated drowning, or waterboarding, used against him.

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